An interview with Madeleine Rosca, mangaka of Hollow Fields

Hi guys! Once again, I’m able to invite yet another mangaka to grace our blog with her presence. Let’s give a warm welcome to Madeleine Rosca, mangaka of Hollow Fields~! =D

I personally find her style of drawing very cute and very colourful. =D So do support Madeleine by hopping over to Gomanga.com and purchase all the volumes of Hollow Fields~!

She was also one of four winners presented with Japan’s first ever “International Manga Award” for her work on Hollow Fields.

When did you discover you could draw?

Very young, like most kids. I wasn’t always particularly better than other kids at drawing; I just really enjoyed it, so the more I did it, the more practice I got. My parents were both art teachers, so there was a lot of encouragement at home.

Why manga?

Manga has a very cinematic feel to it; a good manga should be a lot like watching a good movie. Drawing the panels is a lot like being a director who’s in control of a camera. I liked that sense of action and movement. Often western comics look very static by comparison, so they didn’t appeal as much.

You’ve been both self-published and published by a publisher, could you tell us briefly what it’s like to be on both sides of the fence?

I was very, very briefly self-published before being picked up by Seven Seas. There are good and bad things to both sides. All in all, it’s much better to be published, because you get paid(!), you get professional editorial input and your work reaches a much bigger audience. Benefits to self publishing though, include full control over your work and your story. That’s not always what’s best for the story, though…sometimes having an editor’s opinion really helps.

How do you come up with the ideas for your manga?

I read a lot, watch a lot of films, talk to people…it’s a very organic process. I hope that doesn’t sound pretentious. Writers come up with stories just by living and having experiences. I like steampunk, so most of my stories end up with a steampunk aesthetic, and the themes that come from that – mad science, retro robotics, etc.

What can your readers look forward to in your future projects?

I’ve currently got one in the pipeline but I am still in the annoying ‘negotiating with publishers’ stage. It’s been a slow year, but hopefully next year will see another story coming out.

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