Interview: Dave Chua

Yoyo! How’s your day today? Hope it’s been a fabulous one so far. =) To my American readers (if any), I know yesterday was the anniversary of the 911 tragedy. I know nothing I say will negate the pain and suffering of the ones who went through that awful episode but I have only the best wishes for you guys. Be safe, always.

Okies, today’s awesome guest is going to be Dave Chua! Born in Malaysia, he is the author of Gone Case that also happens to be a graphic novel adaptation collaboration with Koh Hong Teng. Gone Case also won him a Singapore Literature Prize (Commendation), which is like…super awesome if you ask me. His literary works include The Beating and Other Stories, The Divers, and Father’s Gift, which made him the joint winner of the SPH-NAC Golden Point Award for the short story category in 1995.

If you love Dave’s work, then you should go stalk him at the Singapore Writers’ Festival 2012. He, like Jason Erik Lundberg, will appear at a couple of events there. Just don’t be…like…creepy or anything. =x


Tell us about one memorable event that has been most fulfilling for you as a writer.

I would have to say when Koh Hong Teng approached me to do a graphic novel adaptation of Gone Case. It helped to inspire me to take fiction writing seriously again.

You’re a freelance writer who has worked with publications and productions, what made you decide to take a foray into fiction?

I took part in the Golden Point Short Story contest in 1995 and took first prize, which encouraged me to join the Singapore Literature Prize later on.

How has your experience in various media such as sitcoms, films and children’s shows helped you in writing fiction?

I would say that I didn’t have that great an experience writing for television here, where production companies make changes and cuts as they wish. For writing you control the storyline and can do what you want on the page, which is great.

“Gone Case” was adapted into a graphic novel. Why did you decide to collaborate with Koh Hong Teng and what was the process like? 
Hong Teng approached me about adapting the graphic novel, with the key word being adaptation. As he was adapting the story to a visual form, I wanted to give him more freedom, and as long as he kept the framework and the aims of the story, I was fine with it.

You’ve done many things and been to many places, what is the one piece of advice you wished someone had given you when you were still an inexperienced writer?

Read. You can’t be a musician without listening to music, and you can’t be a writer without reading.

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Dave will make his appearance at the following Singapore Writers Festival 2012 events so if you love his work, don’t forget to get your tix!

  • The City as a Character | 3 November 2012 | 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
  • The Malaysian in Singaporean Literature | 3 November 2012 | 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

moon

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